Tag Archives: author’s purpose

Sample text set for teaching authors’ purposes

If students are reading multiple sources on a topic, thinking about the purpose of each source can help students remember the content in the source AND notice the similarities and differences between sources.
What follows is a sample set of sources (on recycling) for students to explore a set of sources (each with a different purpose) and an idea for a three-phase lesson with these sources. (I’m imagining these or similar sources could be used with grades 3-8.) If you haven’t seen the blog entry on using the mnemonic PRIDE as a way to introduce the different authors’ purposes, I’d start there.
AUTHORS’ PURPOSE TEXT SET on RECYCLING
1) In these two articles, the authors try to persuade the reader that recycling is worth the effort or it is not. With younger students, I’d just use the “CON” article; the “PRO” article is pretty sophisticated. Also, when I used this with students, I removed the words “opinion” and “pro” and “con” because I wanted students to notice this for themselves.
(Joining newsela is free!)
2) The majority of this NPR story recounts or tells the story of one group of that uses recycled materials to make  instruments: https://www.npr.org/sections/deceptivecadence/2016/09/14/493794763/from-trash-to-triumph-the-recycled-orchestra
OR if you are working with 3-5th grade students, you might find the book Ada’s ViolinThe Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay by Susan Hood and read this aloud to students. This text also recounts or tells the story of this orchestra.
3) This author at this site instructs or gives steps for an individual to make paper from recycled newspaper –

4) This author’s purpose seems to be to describe products that are made of recycled material.

5) The author’s purpose in both of these sources seems to be to explain how paper is recycled.
NOTE: For these last two sources, there might be some conversation around whether these authors’ purposes are to explain or to instruct; I lean towards explain because these are not steps the individual can take on their own BUT it’s a worthy discussion to have (if an issue emerges) with students because they are engaged in critical thinking!
THREE-PHASE LESSON IDEA (in brief ;))
Phase 1 Meet the Sources
  • Briefly introduce the set of sources. (You might include links in a Google doc or print out hard copies.)
  • Encourage students to explore (read-view-listen to) each source in the set–with a partner, in a small group, or independently. Pose this question: What are you learning about recycling? You can ask small groups to stop and discuss this as they engage with each source or you can ask this when you lean in to confer with students.
  • Close by asking questions like the following: What did you learn about recycling today that you thought was helpful? Fascinating? Hopeful? Why read-view-listen to more than one source on a topic?

Phase 2 Meet the Strategies

  • Introduce or review the different types of author’s purposes. (If you are just starting, look for how in this blog entry.)
  • Ask students (independently or with a partner) to reread-view-listen to each of the sources and jot down notes about the authors’ purpose. You might do one together.  As the review each source, encourage them to think about the content of the source–what are they learning as far as content–and how it’s easier to remember that if they think about the author’s purpose. If they come up with author’s purposes that are different than what you had in mind, ask them to explain their thinking–that requires critical thinking. Be open to what they come up with if they can justify their thinking (with background knowledge, text evidence, etc.)         
  • Close with a question for conversation like “How are these sources similar and different? How does thinking about the author’s purpose help you explain the similarities and differences?”
Phase 3 Meet the Response 
  • You might provide a writing prompt like one of the following:
    • What have you learned about recycling that is important for other people to know? What are two sources you might recommend to others? Describe what you learned in the sources and why someone should read-view-listen to both.
    • How has reading more than one source on this topic changed your thinking about this topic? Describe important ideas you are walking away with, citing the sources.
  • Help students plan. See my notes for phase 3 in the lesson on introducing author’s purpose.

BTW – If you give this text set & lesson a try, please let me know how it goes! Or feel free to touch base with me before teaching. I’d be glad to be a think partner!

If you need more ideas on how to teach with multiple sources (including putting together text sets), see my new book Nurturing Informed Thinking (with Heinemann).

Hope this helps.

S