Start the year with THIEVES and a clear purpose for previewing/predicting

Teaching students to “get ahead” by using the mnemonic THIEVES to preview a text is an easy way to start the year and nurture students’ sense of agency–especially if you are reading feature-dense nonfiction like magazine articles, websites, textbooks and so forth. In the poster below (created by a colleague!) you can see how this mnemonic helps students preview a text strategically and then make an informed prediction.

Unit 4 THIEVES

A FEW TIPS

  • Create THIEVES bookmarks for the students that they can easily use across the day. Below is a bookmark I created on tag board for students. The sticky note is one student’s interpretation of the word “thief.” I always talk with students about how being a thief is about “getting ahead” of the author.

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  • Set a clear purpose for previewing. You could have them preview to “find out what the article is about” but I’ve found this is too broad for many students. They zoom in on one thing like a photo of an alligator in an article on environmental issues and say, “It’s about alligators.” Consider setting a clearer purpose like – What do you think the author’s main/central message or idea will be? What do you think is the author’s purpose for writing this text? The goal is for the students to synthesize the information they’ve gleaned during the preview and make an informed prediction.
  • Be prepared to model or think aloud in front of students. In advance of teaching lessons with THIEVES, I take notes for a think aloud. Below are my notes for a lesson with a text on droughts.

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  • With feature dense text, just use THIEVES for a 2-page spread. The students might get overwhelmed by previewing a whole chapter or an article that is several pages. Frequently, there’s enough going on in just the first two pages of a text to give them enough information to make an informed prediction.

Screen Shot 2015-09-05 at 7.02.03 AMScholastic News, an example of a feature-dense text!

  • Teach students to think flexibly as they use THIEVES. Texts are complex. Sometimes there are headings, sometimes there are not. Sometimes looking at the visuals before reading every first sentence is more helpful. Sometimes reading the title and headings and intro is enough. Students can get overwhelmed. Teach students to consider the title, heading, intro, etc. as choices for what they can preview to “get ahead.” I’ve blogged more about this need to be flexible if you want more info.

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There are LOTS of resources on the Internet for how to use THIEVES – just Google “THIEVES mnemonic.” Also – if you have a copy of my first book Close Reading of Informational Texts, Chapter 5 goes into depth about how to use THIEVES with sample lessons, a rubric for assessing students’ predictions and tips for conferring with students.

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Okay…hope this helps. I’d love to hear your anecdotes about using THIEVES with students!

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2 thoughts on “Start the year with THIEVES and a clear purpose for previewing/predicting

  1. Laura Beltchenko

    I have been advocating the this strategy for many years!!!! Its value is extremely beneficial for all students especially those students that need organizational structures to unpack complex text. This document from readwritethink.org (ILA & NCTE) is a great one for supporting this great strategy that Sunday has brought forward. http://web.uvic.ca/~stemed/2010-ArchiveSiteContent/CD-Resources/THIEVESaPre-ReadingStrategy.pdf
    As always, thank you Sunday for your wisdom and guidance. Laura B.

    Reply
    1. Eileen

      Sunday, thank you for your incredible expertise. As you point out, THIEVES is so helpful in increasing student agency, something that we all want for our students!

      Reply

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